viernes, 19 de diciembre de 2014

JOB> East Asian Studies at the University of Sheffield

SENIOR LECTURESHIP IN EAST ASIAN STUDIES

This is an exciting opportunity for applicants with a proven
publication record and teaching ability to join a major centre for
the study of East Asia. We welcome applications from scholars who
can teach and conduct research in one or more East
Asian languages in addition to English, and in any discipline within
the broadly defined fields of Chinese, Japanese and Korean
Studies. We particularly welcome applicants with a
cross-country/region-wide interest and in the disciplines of Culture and
Media.

The successful candidate will have an established international
reputation in the broadly defined field of East Asian Studies
and have an outstanding publication record. You will have a PhD in a
relevant subject (or have an equivalent qualification/
experience). The ability  to provide research leadership, attract
external funding and research students to the School, and act
as a mentor to newly appointed colleagues in any area of the School
is essential. You will be expected to represent the
School in the wider University and to promote and represent the
University and the discipline nationally and internationally.

The post is the equivalent to an Associate Professorship at an
American university.

Job Reference Number: UOS009840

Job Title: Senior Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences

Department: School of East Asian Studies

Salary: Grade 9

£48,743 - £54,841 per annum, with potential to progress to £63,552

Closing Date: 23rd January 2015

For further information, see the University of Sheffield website at
https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/jobs/

--
Emeritus Professor James H. Grayson
School of East Asian Studies
The University of Sheffield
6/8 Shearwood Road
Sheffield S10 2TD

(tel) +44 114 222-8418
(fax) +44 114 222-8432
(email) j.h.grayson@sheffield.ac.uk j.h.grayson@sheffield.ac.uk

>

jueves, 18 de diciembre de 2014

The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus Newsletter
Newsletter No. 50. 2014       

December 15, 2014

New Articles

Andrew DeWit

Peter Dale Scott

Rey Ventura


Greetings! 
  
The time is now to help keep the Journal a vibrant voice exploring the Asia-Pacific and the world. With $5,000 toward the $12,000 needed to operate in 2015 and allow us to redesign and upgrade the site, we need your support. We have a donor who pledges to match gifts of $50-200 during the final weeks of our drive. APJ is a 501 (c) tax exempt organization; your contribution is tax deductible. Please donate here!

This issue mirrors our twin approaches in showing the achievements of the Asia-Pacific while highlighting ongoing historical and contemporary problems.Following up on his recent article, Andrew DeWit reports on the initiatives towards building "smart communities" throughout Japan. Inspired by German Stadtwerke in the energy industry, the movement hopes to surpass the German model by creating "sustainable economic growth" development that is remarkably not driven by large corporations but by local governments.
Last week, the Historical Science Society of Japan [!] issued a public statement in English on the recent wartime comfort women controversy centered o the Asahi Shinbun. While the testimony of Yoshida Seiji has long been discredited, the revelation that Asahi had cited him in the 1990s has led to dangerous attacks on the 1993 Kono Statement and the historical facts of the abuses of the Japanese military. The statement criticizes the Abe administration's blatant efforts to revise wartime history, clarifying the points of contention and pointing out flaws in the arguments made by the administration and its neonationalist allies.

Joshua Oppenheimer's recent award-winning film The Act of Killing presents the genocide in Indonesia forty years ago in the words of many of its perpetrators, but it does not address  the pivotal role of the United States in the killings and aftermath. Peter Dale Scott examines how the "deeply flawed authoritarian development model" of American social-scientific modernization theory paved the way for the atrocities, calling for academics to reflect on university culture then and now.

"'I died at that moment,' he said. He went under the knives, scalpels, forceps, scissors, and needles. A foot-long cut was carved on his right side." Writer and filmmaker Rey Ventura presents the dramatic story of how Filipino man came to "donate" one of his kidneys to a Japanese man in 1996, from his collection of nonfiction stories, Cherry Blossoms in the Time of Earthquakes and Tsunami.
KOREA FOCUSKOREA FOCUS



Distinguishing between operational control of the military in peacetime and wartime is realistically inconceivable. Even in peacetime, General Curtis Scaparrotti, commander of the Combined Forces Command, steers war planning, crisis management and other core military operations. Thus, the term “operational control in wartime” has no distinction. The return of operational control was first put forward in the U.S. Senate`s 1989 Nunn-Warner Amendment.
Politics
Politics
North Korea has failed in economic self-reliance, while South Korea has failed in
achieving military self-reliance. The North's failure is so bad that even pro-North Korean activists in the South are reluctant to live there. But w...
Economy
Economy
At a recent dinner gathering, a person asked what needed to be done to boost
domestic consumption. A former cabinet member said that it could be easily done when the National Assembly and the news media...
Society
Society
Golden rice fields look forlorn and serene. The scenery of harvest, the result of farmers'
sweaty work, looks picturesque. But it has a heartbreaking story of political economics of its own. Farmers make a living, send their child...
Culture
Culture
A recent posting on a humor website reads, “Ten-somethings have no discretion; 20-
somethings have no answer; 30-somethings have no house; 40-somethings have no money; 50-somethings have no job; 60-somethings have no strength...
Essays
Slow economic growth and a sharp drop in labor productivity has shrunk North Korea’s real gross domestic product by 12 percent since 1990, when it was 35.0 trillion [South Korean] won. In 2013, the North’ real GDP was 30.8 trillion won. A further decline in labor productivity will create additional problems in the course of reunification of the Korean peninsula. The labor productivity gap between North and South Korea will widen and the cost burden of reunification on South Koreans could rise exponentially.
Expansion of economic cooperation between the two Koreas could close the widening gap in labor productivity. The possibility for improvement has been...
Features
Features
Twenty people in their early to mid-thirties are living on a shared housing scheme called
"People in Our Neighborhood." Six students of a Buddhist university who dreamed of making a living as farmers began the arrangement three y...
Bookreview
Bookreview
In this age of centenarians, aging well is becoming as important as well-
being. It is time people thought seriously about how to age and how to spend their later years. How did our ancestors, whose average life...
Interview
Interview
One of the biggest business stories in Korea this year was the merger of Daum
Communications and Kakao on October 1. Founded in 1995, Daum...
Koreana_img
KOREA FOUNDATION